Category Archives: Characters

Beginning, Middle, THE END…!

…Well not quite the end of our 2017 Adopt An Author project for Carden but over the past couple of weeks Year 6 have been focussing on their STORY ENDINGS….

So, for the next challenge, I wonder if you could write a paragraph telling me how your story ends! It doesn’t have to be very detailed at all, just enough to make you think about it and have an idea of where the story would be going once you got going.

Look forward to reading them!

Rob

Carden, as ever had great fun with the challenge – we’ve picked a few of our favourite’s to share with you…

 

Thanks so much for all of these great story endings – I really enjoyed reading them all. You all seem to be using your imaginations to their full, and it sounds like you’re enjoying the stories you’re telling – which is the most important thing by far. If you enjoy your own story, then others will too, and it’s much easier to write as well.

Your endings were all exciting and full of twists. I did think though that some of them didn’t quite feel like ENDINGS to stories. A story end should bring your character’s journey to a finish – your character should finally achieve his or her goal. Once that has been done, then you can throw in a big twist or ‘cliff-hanger.’ To make readers want to carry on to the next book.

But my advice is DO NOT WORRY ABOUT THE NEXT BOOK. Just tell the story you want to tell as if it is the ONLY book. Finish the story fully and then worry about what might occur next in your main character’s life. As an example: If your hero is a tough but lonely detective who is trying to catch a criminal – for instance – but the end of the story that character should have caught the criminal and become less lonely by making new friends. THAT is the ending – a satisfying and happy one for your character. BUT then you can reveal that the criminal he caught is just one of many criminals from a huge gang of genius thieves. So we know there will be lots more adventures to come. The cliffhanger there is good because we have already had the happy ending before.

The other important thing about an ending is that your main character should have been changed by the adventure. So they began as lonely and ended up with friends, or they started the story as mean and ended up being kind. IT can be very a very simple change, but there should definitely be one.

They were all great fun to read, so thank you!

Full of enthusiasm for such great work, Rob set the next challenge…..

I think it would be good to work on this more in the next task. So, could you all write for me in just one or two sentences how your main character changes in your story? Don’t write a chapter or paragraph from your story – just a sentence from you to me saying ‘My character changes because (and then give the reason)’

This should be a change in your character’s personality – not in the action. So they go from being nice to mean, or good to evil maybe? Looking forward to hearing your answers!

Now, normally we might make you wait for the next instalment to find out what brilliant work Carden have created, but we’re feeling especially generous this week, so…. HOT OFF THE PRESS! Here’s head teacher Helen who sent Rob their work…

We finished the book this morning too so I suspect there might be a spike in sales (to the tune of 21) of Wild Boy 2 this evening.

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We’re nearing the end of our Adopt An Author journey for 2017, and it looks as though these wonderful characters that Carden have created have been on a pretty fantastic journey themselves – we think all the authors have too!

We’ll see you next time at the party, when Year 6 meet Rob!

Until then,

AAA x

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Dingle Dangle Diaries!

Goldstone’s adoptive author Guy Bass has welcomed Year 3 back and it’s evident that he LOVES a pun – (well who doesn’t?!)

Here’s hopping you all and Year 3 had a cracking break filled with egg-ceptional egg-citement.

Guy and Year 3 have been exchanging some lovely emails and creating some fantastic work over the last few weeks…

Dear Guy,

My name is Logan from Year 3. We think your story is brilliant when Fulbert Freakfinder gets pushed off the ladder. We could picture him in our minds hanging upside down by his pants, it was hilarious. I am looking forward to meeting you in May. I especially enjoy your challenges and me and my friends work has been selected to send to you this week, so I hope you enjoy reading it.

Have a dingle dangle.

Logan

Here’s a pic of Logan and his three pals, one as you can see has a brilliant mind! Logan wrote a lovely email to Guy. As you remember they’ve been reading Stitch Head and it sounds as though they’re loving it!

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Guy had set the class a fantastic challenge…

What I’d like you to do is come up with an extract from the young Professor Erasmus’s diary from back when he was a child. Erasmus has gathered leftovers from his father’s experiments and is about to bring his first creation to almost-life. Here are some things to think about:

– How is the young Erasmus feeling before he awakens Stitch Head?
– What does he think about his first creation? Is he happy with how Stitch Head     turned out, or was he hoping for more impressive ‘parts’? Was Erasmus lonely     and looking to make a friend or did he want to make a terrifying monster? Or     maybe he wanted to be just like his dad, Professor Erasmus Senior?
– What time of day or night is it?
– Does Erasmus bring Stitch Head to almost-life in secret or does Professor              Erasmus Senior know about it?
– How does Erasmus awaken Stitch Head? What potions and equipment does he   use?

 

We loved delving into these diaries and Guy did too…

Thanks again for sending me your fantastic writing. I was really impressed with the way you brought the scenes to life (as young Erasmus brought Stitch Head to almost-life) and the imagination that went into work.

Holly, Milo, Scarlett and Poppy, I enjoyed how your diary entries gave a sense of the passing of time, especially when Erasmus realised how long it would take to make his creation. I also loved the idea of the dawn light “creeping along the corridor” as if it wasn’t to be trusted…
Felix, “forever glue” is my new favourite bonding agent! I love your writing, especially Stitch Head’s batty behaviour when he’s first awakened. Stitch Head yanking on Erasmus’s hair “like he was taking a strawberry plant out of the ground” is a wonderfully absurd simile. And it was great to see Erasmus getting the better of Stitch Head in the “gobbling a plate of worms first” (!) game by tricking him – it’s a clever way to make you wonder why Erasmus made his creation in the first place.
Sonny and Sam, what a tragic tale! The passing of time here is a nice way to make Erasmus’s separation from Stitch Head all the more heartbreaking – especially as he’s made to feel ashamed for creating him in the first place. It’s a far cry from the touching line, “He looks a bit ugly I suppose … but I love him all the same”. Nice one.
Ben, Hana and Lucas, My favourite part of your writing was how you evoked the moment of awakening after a tense set-up. “As I pumped air being into its mouth, its stomach started rising up and down” paints a great picture. And the idea of Stitch Head wriggling into life is a line I wish I’d thought of myself!
Emily and Mercy, I really enjoyed how you explored the mixed emotions Erasmus felt about telling his dad about his creation. He’s desperate for his father to be proud of him, but still he skulks around and hopes not to wake him … and even after he brings his creation to almost-life he still dares not tell him. This is fascinating and makes the reader wonder why Erasmus is so conflicted. A lovely example of “Show, don’t tell”, which is good advice for any writer. Well done.
Emily Lucy and Marlie, This is a fantastic line: “Finally, I found essence of nightshade, lava and air freshener.” Because any new creation needs to smell fresh! Wonderful. I also loved the idea that Stitch Head was sewn together with fabric from his dad’s pants!
Arthur, Joe, Logan and Rory, your piece was short and to the point, and I think it had my favourite line of all: “I sneakily took some eyeballs from the eyeball cupboard” This single line says so much about the world of the castle. Great work!
We’ve had a sneak preview into the next challenge and we CAN’T WAIT to see the creations – all we’ll say is that it….. NO WE COULDN’T POSSIBLY, you’ll just have to check back next week!!!
Team AAA x

BIG STORY START MOMENT!

Welcome back after the break! Was the Easter bunny kind? Did we all eat a teeny tiny bit too much chocolate?! We hope you’re looking forward to the summer term -we’re all very excited to hear what our adoptees have been up to! So let’s head over to Carden to find out….

A few weeks ago adopted author Rob Llyod Jones asked Year 6 to think about their characters normal life and then to think of a THING that could happen that would thrust their character into a story!

It’s safe to say Year 6 fully embraced this task! We’ve picked a few of our favourites to share with you and Rob had some great feedback too.

Hello all,

Again I really enjoyed reading about all the events that start your exciting stories. I really liked how many of you described your character’s ‘normal life’ before the event that throws him or her OUT of their normal lives and INTO the adventure. Many of you begin by saying your character is living that ‘normal life’ and then use words like these: ‘But then…’, ‘But one day…’ ‘or Then suddenly…’ That’s perfect! Most stories go exactly like this:

Once upon a time there was a (CHARACTER)
Every day he/she (NORMAL LIFE)
Until one day (BIG STORY START MOMENT)
Because of that (THE REST OF THE STORY!)

FEEDBACK:

Aurittri
Great Aurittri! I can’t think of many better story starts than a bullied schoolgirl discovering a secret dragon! What happens next, I wonder?

Hailey
I enjoyed reading about Loliea, Hailey – and liked that you used the words ‘Just then’ in your paragraph. That’s what all stories are about : things happening.

Tayla
Puggi is a fun character Taylor! I think you’ve got a GREAT story starting moment here, as Puggi meets a puggicorn and swaps identities! Perfect!

Connor
PERFECT Connor! Stevie Wellard is a fun character, and you’ve given him a really clear and interesting ‘story start moment’ when he finds a portal in the loo!

Max
I like that you begin by describing ‘Thats what he did everyday’, Max. That’s how stories begin, then they tell us what happened to change all of that – and you have your character being hit by a car! That’s great, now the story has REALLY got going!

Humayra:
Kate is a fun character, Humayra –with the power to control the weather! Is the big event that gets the story going that she loses this power? That is an interesting twist on a usual superhero story! A superhero becomes normal, rather than someone normal becomes a superhero.

Carden you clever lot! The THINGS that happened to your characters have really captured Rob’s and Team AAA’s imaginations! Coming up Rob has a brilliant task for you guys, so until next time….!

Team AAA x

 

Cool Characters at Carden!

Carden have been chatting all about character these past couple of weeks and in response to Rob’s last task have come up with some very interesting beings of their own – some we’d even like to meet IRL! Here’s a few examples of their brilliant work below:

Hello all

I loved reading your character descriptions. All of them were brilliantly described.

Bradley, Tayla, Darcey, Tommy, Max, Ella, Junior, Nillab,
All of your characters were so much fun to read, so thank you for telling me about them! It seemed that you had fun writing abut them too, because you told me a lot of great detail. You told me how your characters looked and Some of you added interesting background stories too, which is great. It would be good though to know a bit more about how your characters behave now. Characters should always be ACTING – that’s what teaches us about them, rather than how they look or dress. Have a think about how your characters act – are they kind, caring, or evil? Can you give me examples of them being so?

Aunittri
I love that you describe Violence Violet as ‘Nice and Brutal’ ! That is a very interesting way to describe someone – can you think why she is like that? And how does she show these two sides of herself?

Tarian
The Noose is cock and childish – that’s a nice bit of character description. Can you think of examples of how the character shows this?

Carol
Siera Everett is a cool character name! I love that you told me about how she took in the orphan boy – is shows the kind side of her character by the way she acts – which is perfect writing.

Humayra
I like the background details about Katie – and that you say she is Nosy and naughty! Can you think of ways she shows this about herself?

Aldric
I loved this Aldric! DJ sounds really interesting. You’ve created world and characters full of possible stories, with loads of good detail.

Ollie Wow – Dagon sounds really interesting! Why is he so evil though? You tell me how he became the god of the undead, but I’d like to know more about his feelings.

Phoebe
This is a great character description, Phoebe. You tell me a lot about who Sophie is, rather than what he looks like – which is perfect. She sounds like someone who would be a lot of fun to write a story about.

Hailey
This is such a lovely, simply idea for a character, Hailey – with loads of good background. I’d like to know a bit more abut who Loliea is NOW though. Think about her daily routines and hopes and fears…

Michael
Jonny Gibson sounds like a really interesting character, Michael. I like that he ‘hates children’ – but can you tell me why? You describe him well, telling me about who he is rather than what he looks like, which is great.

Lilia
Ziggie sounds like a very interesting character Lilia, and you describe her really
well. You say she is mischievous – but can you give me any examples of when and how?

Connor W
Its great that you chose to write a made u story about a real person, Connow – and a really interesting one too. There’s good background detail here = but can you tell me more about how Paul Pogba thinks and feels?

 

Rob thought that these characters were so great that they should take them further….

Now that you have thought up such great characters, lets do something with them. Most stories begin with a character living their normal life (some people call this the ‘status quo’). That normal life doesn’t have to be a USUAL life to you and me – but just one that for them in their world is normal. So Wild Boy’s normal life at the start is to live on a freak show and fight with Augustus Finch and spy on people using his detective skills. Then SOMETHING HAPPENS to thrusts the character from their normal life and into an adventure. In Wild Boy that SOMETHING is when he defends Sir Oswald and so he has to run away. So then he has to steal money to survive, which ends up with him stealing the mysterious letter – and after that the story takes off. I would like you to think of your character’s normal life that you have all described, and then think what THING could happen to them that would thrust them into a story, and maybe a little more in a paragraph about what that story might be.

Good luck!

Rob

 

We can’t wait to see what Ziggie, DJ, Siera Everett, Violence Violet et al have been up to! Nice work Carden!

Team AAA x

Romance blossoming in Lizzy Bennet’s world

The girls at Carden Primary have been reading Marcia Williams’ next book (yes, they get TWO!)

The story is inspired by a book called Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen which was written in 1813 (ages ago!) Marcia’s book is written from Lizzy Bennet’s point of view. When Lizzy Bennet’s father gives her a diary, she fancies she will use it to write a novel, as her real life is exceedingly dull. Then the handsome Mr. Bingley moves to nearby Netherfield Park, and suddenly life is every bit as thrilling as a novel would be. Who will he dance with at the Meryton ball? Who is his haughty friend? Will Lizzy ever receive a marriage proposal?

Marcia set the girls a writing task:

Dear Year 6,

I have been rereading Lizzy Bennet’s Diary up to the same page as you, and it strikes me how very difficult Lizzy is to please.  How will she ever find a husband with such high standards?!
I wondered if you could each write a description of the man you would have Lizzy fall for, if you were the author instead of Jane Austen.  Just close your eyes and imagine him walking into the room and Lizzy falling in love!
1.  How does he enter the room, does he stride, shuffle or even trip?  Maybe he is shy and just pokes his head around the door?  Is he dark or fair?  Think about his clothes, his hairstyle, his shoes?  Maybe, he has a scar or a moustache?
2.  Is he clever?  Cold or warm hearted.  Friendly or shy?  Funny or severe?  How does his personality differ from Lizzy’s?
3.  Is he rich and aristocratic or does he come from a modest background? Is he a soldier?  What if any occupation does he have?
4.  What are his likes and dislikes?
5.  What are his strengths and weaknesses?  Maybe he eats too much chocolate – has dozens of dogs – or falls asleep at the table!  Only you know!
These are some of the things you might like to think about when you are writing about him.
I can’t wait to see what you all come up with!
Good luck,
Marcia
And the girls did a great job, they wrote very descriptive pieces detailing the moment the two meet. How romantic! These are two of our faves…

Well done girls and we hope you are looking forward to meeting your author Marcia Williams TOMORROW! So exciting!

Team AAA x

Gory Gladiators at Patcham Juniors

A couple of weeks ago, Patcham Juniors’ adopted author, Sarah Lean set the class a writing task. They had to describe a setting, lets read her email below:

I hope you found the mind maps useful to collect some ideas.

The setting is the place where things happen.

Leo imagines he is an amphitheatre, fighting bears or the gladiator of old, wearing a helmet

and with crowds cheering him on.

Imagine an amphitheatre…

In stories, a writer needs to think about the setting using all the senses: SIGHT, HEARING, SMELL, TASTE AND TOUCH, and also what it FEELS LIKE to be in a place.

Write a couple of paragraphs about a gladiator who is waiting underground and then comes into the amphitheatre to face their enemy. Describe what they would see, hear, smell, taste and what things are like to touch. It’s also important to know how they feel in that place. No need to do a battle scene, but concentrate on describing the place as fully as possible.

Things to think about:

What might a bear or lion smell like?

What does a huge crowd sound like?

How big is the amphitheatre?

What do the walls of the cells underground feel like to touch?

How does it feel to be wearing a helmet? Can the gladiator see clearly?

How does it feel to come out of the cold shadows underground to a hot arena?

The responses were fantastic as always and actually pretty gory! Here are two of our favourites:

Now, the pieces are gory, but also atmospheric and quite vivid! It’s almost like a film script, you can just imagine how the gladiator is feeling in that moment. How fantastic.

Well done Year 3 and I think Sarah agreed:

Dear Year 3

Thank you for showing me your work. I am impressed by the sense of danger and fear that you have all described in the anxious moments before a gladiator has to go out into the amphitheatre. Using all the senses brings the writing to life to conjure up a terrifying moment.

Herbie created super tension with the questions the gladiator is asking himself, something a writer works hard to do. And what a dramatic moment for the gladiator to be faced with his son!

George’s description sounded like poetry, as did Isobel’s, which really conjured up the feel of the arena. There were some vivid descriptions, and I especially liked Bertie’s range of smells and the lovely image of light through the bars of the cage from Isaac, as well as Lewis’s alliteration of smashing swords.

Isabella asked good questions of the gladiator in her letter to get a whole range of the experience of the gladiator, and I thought it was a super idea from Jane to have the gladiator write to his mother as it turned the writing instantly into an emotional read.

Well done everyone. I hope you enjoyed it.

Sarah

 

Where does a fish keep its money? In a riverbank!

Woodingdean have sent off their drawings of animals to Gary and they are pretty wonderful, have a peek below!

Dear Gary

We have all sorts of pets in our class. Some of us have cats, some have dogs. There are also fish, chinchillas, gerbils, rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, chickens and tortoises. Finley doesn’t have any pets but he wishes he had a pet koala, Anya would like some chickens, Teddy would like a bear (his name IS Teddy).

We really enjoyed drawing the animals and have learnt a lot about drawing cartoons. Rabbits were particularly popular to draw as its Easter. We have attached some of the best drawings for you to look at.
We can’t wait to meet you!
4PA

Easter is over, tummies are full of chocolate and everyone is rested, so we are back to Julius Zebra! Gary has decided to ramp up these fab illustrations to the next level, read on and find out what the next task is:

Hello everybody!

I hope you had a fun Easter break!

Thank you for your BRILLIANT (as always) drawings! You have crazy pets!!!

This week, I’d like you to draw your pets as GLADIATORS! I’ve attached two sheets to help you. There are helmets, weapons, shin pads, all sorts of things! Also, have a flick through the book to see if there’s any other types of armour or weapons you’d like to dress your pet up in.

Anyway, good luck dressing up your pets and I can’t wait to see the results!

Gary

Talented artists at Carden…

Carden Primary School have well and truly blown their adopted author Marcia away with their drawings of character from ‘Les Mis’. Marcia says “What lovely pieces of work, which really show not only the children’s artistic talent, but their engagement in the emotional side of the story.  Thank you for sending them to me.” Take a look below…

Our favourite has to be this one. It must have taken ages to fit all writing around the drawing. That Javert is a complicated character, no wonder you had so many questions! Great work!

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Gladiators and Interior Designers

Last week, Patcham Juniors took descriptions from their book ‘Hero’ by their adopted author Sarah Lean and designed the main character, Leo’s bedroom! Well, needless to say, Sarah was pretty impressed. She said:

Thank you for showing me some of your work. Yes, Leo would have gladiator posters and glow in the dark stars in his bedroom and you have summed him up really well. Bertie is right that Leo is fairly shy, and as Laura wrote, he doesn’t like football. Leo does like to learn as Lilly mentioned, and he has a BIG imagination which he exercises all the time, which is what Grace so perfectly wrote.

The drawings were lovely, with great details from Dayna and I especially liked Nicole’s gladiator duvet cover. Oliver’s picture had a super 3D sense with the way he drew the furniture – are you a budding artist? I was very interested that Alfie said gladiators were like knights (you will find out why at the end of the book) and also that Herbie mentioned Leo might look like someone at school!

My favourite comment was from Sid – yes, daydreaming is just like writing stories. It’s why I love my job. I can daydream while I’m walking with my dogs and think about stories, and the more I exercise my imagination, the bigger it seems to get!

Well done everyone.

Sarah next task is an interesting one. Its inspired by the idea of peer pressure.

When I’m thinking about a character and their story I also think about who is going to be reading the book and the kinds of things that go on in their lives. So, this week I wondered if you’d like to have a discussion about Peer Pressure… (based around Chapters 5 and 6 of HERO)

To be a gladiator, Leo would have to carry a sword and defeat the gladiator of old. But actually Leo wants to be the kind of person that he thinks a gladiator is. Leo says, “I wanted other people to think I was brave, strong and worthwhile.” (p68)

What kind of person is Leo trying to be?

How could someone become brave, strong and worthwhile?

What kind of person would you like to be? (Calm, patient, loving, bold, courageous…)

As you may have read, Leo thinks he has to impress other people by doing the things that they do.

Warren says to Leo, “Thing is, some of us still aren’t sure you’ve got what it takes to hang out with us. You’re going to have to prove yourself first.” And then Warren tells Leo to push a mobility scooter into the pond. (p66)

Does Leo become a gladiator by pushing the scooter into the pond?

Do you think he is being brave, strong and worthwhile by doing this? If not, what kind of person is he being?

Why do you think Leo sinks the scooter even though it doesn’t feel right?

What would you have said to Warren if he had asked you to sink the scooter?

Maybe you could write a few lines about the kind of person you would like to be or, if you were Leo, what you would say to Warren.

 

Woodingdean are a bunch of comedians!

Remember Gary sent a joke to his class in his first email? Well they responded with some very funny ones…

We love cats and have some good jokes for you:
Q: What do you call a nocturnal cat?
A: A meeowl
(Dana)
Q:What’s the best way to describe a cat?
A: Purrrrfect
(Jasmine O)
Q: What do you call a tall cat?
A: Top cat
(Teddy)
This week, Gary has set the class quite the task. They have to draw their own animal using a similar technique to how the class drew their version of Julius – using shapes first then adding the detail.
I would like you to draw a shape for the head, a shape for the body, draw arms and legs, add a nose, eyes, ears and a tail, then add a pattern or texture. you could draw a cartoon based on your pet, or any animal you like. But if you break it down into these easy stages, you will find it extremely easy. I’ve included some drawings as suggestions for shapes etc.
Next week we’ll dress up your character!