Monthly Archives: April 2017

5P’S EXCELLENT EDITS!

“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.”

That’s a quote from the brilliant children’s author Dr Seuss (above) as this week we’re sharing 5P’s EXCELLENT EDITS!

Before the Easter break Ali emailed her adoptees with updates on her super soup making! STOP Ali, you’re making us all hungry and we’ve still got another hour till lunch!

This week I am running, walking, making soup…

This is the soup I made on Sunday. Cauliflower, potato & cheese.

Loooooovely, if I do say so myself. I’m making lots of soup this week.

I don’t know why. I just AM, OK?!

…and redrafting. Or editing. This basically means I am going all the way through a story I wrote earlier and rewriting bits of it, adding extra bits, taking some bits away entirely. It tales a lot of concentration and in many ways is harder work than writing a whole story for the first time. On the upside, I’ve just engulfed one of my main characters in a swarm of bees. (Yeah. I’m like that.) I didn’t have that bit in the first draft.

Editing is a really important part of being a good writer. It’s tempting to think that the first thing you’ve written is brilliant and could NEVER be improved. But you always can improve your first draft. So this week I’m not asking you to write anything. I’m just asking you to IMPROVE something. I’ve attached your task. It’s some writing which is… a bit iffy. There are all kinds of problems with it. See if you can find them and improve them. You can rewrite bits if you like, adding stuff or changing words to make it more exciting –  or just to make it make sense. You can do this as a class or in groups, in pairs or on your own – I’ll let Paul decide.

Good luck, 5P!

Ali

PS. This message will self destruct in 5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – RUUUUUUUUUUN!!!

Here’s the original text – and let’s see what 5P made of it….

What’s wrong with this story? Can you improve it?

Bella woke up in the moonlite and heard strange sounds coming from outside thw window, oh no, she thought, who could that be? She creeped downstares and opened the front door but there was only a shadow in the distance which scared her even more because it was making a mowning sound like a creature.

Suddenly it sprang out of the trees with a scream and Bella was scared to deth. She went and got a stick from the cupboard and threw it at the monster which was running towards the dore.

But as soon as she saw the monster she was gobsmacked because she knew it wasn’t a monster. It was something else.

 

We AND Ali were super impressed….

Well done on your editing before you went off on hols. From the samples I’ve seen it looks like you all picked up the obvious errors and also added some really nice – much better – descriptive words and phrases. And well done Kalina and Matt for getting rid of that ghastly word ‘gobsmacked’ and replacing it with something better. I put it in there because it’s an example of a cliché… the kind of thing which gets said a lot for a while and is a bit of a trend and quite annoying. If I smacked someone in the gob every time they said ‘gobsmacked’ I’d be a champion prize-fighter by now. And in prison, obviously.

Listen out for clichés in the news. The one you’ll hear all the time at the moment is ‘going forward’. It really doesn’t mean anything. Politicians say it a lot. They tend to use a lot of clichés. They’re always saying ‘let me be clear’ and ‘hardworking British people’.

Try to avoid clichés – like ‘scared to death‘ and ‘over the moon‘ and so on. Everyone knows what you mean but they get so boring and predictable. Words are for playing with. You can create your own clichés if you fancy it. Try it out for fun. Instead of ‘sick as a parrot‘ you could say ‘bilious as a bullfrog‘. Instead of ‘over the moon‘ you could say ‘orbiting Jupiter‘.  My favourite made up one is in the Shapeshifter series – ‘mad as a jar of gerbils‘.

A bilious bulfrog, yesterday.

Make a list of boring clichés and then come up with some 5P replacements! And start using them around school. After a while everybody else will start to know who’s from 5P without even looking at them.

OK – the MAIN challenge now. At the end of last term I sent you a small book called A SUDDEN DROP. We’ll be using this….

imgres-4.jpg

BUT…I’m afraid you’re going to have to wait until next week to find out what 5P’s next challenge was….

5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – RUUUUUUUUUUN!!!

Team AAA x

 

Advertisements

Dingle Dangle Diaries!

Goldstone’s adoptive author Guy Bass has welcomed Year 3 back and it’s evident that he LOVES a pun – (well who doesn’t?!)

Here’s hopping you all and Year 3 had a cracking break filled with egg-ceptional egg-citement.

Guy and Year 3 have been exchanging some lovely emails and creating some fantastic work over the last few weeks…

Dear Guy,

My name is Logan from Year 3. We think your story is brilliant when Fulbert Freakfinder gets pushed off the ladder. We could picture him in our minds hanging upside down by his pants, it was hilarious. I am looking forward to meeting you in May. I especially enjoy your challenges and me and my friends work has been selected to send to you this week, so I hope you enjoy reading it.

Have a dingle dangle.

Logan

Here’s a pic of Logan and his three pals, one as you can see has a brilliant mind! Logan wrote a lovely email to Guy. As you remember they’ve been reading Stitch Head and it sounds as though they’re loving it!

The creators.JPG
Guy had set the class a fantastic challenge…

What I’d like you to do is come up with an extract from the young Professor Erasmus’s diary from back when he was a child. Erasmus has gathered leftovers from his father’s experiments and is about to bring his first creation to almost-life. Here are some things to think about:

– How is the young Erasmus feeling before he awakens Stitch Head?
– What does he think about his first creation? Is he happy with how Stitch Head     turned out, or was he hoping for more impressive ‘parts’? Was Erasmus lonely     and looking to make a friend or did he want to make a terrifying monster? Or     maybe he wanted to be just like his dad, Professor Erasmus Senior?
– What time of day or night is it?
– Does Erasmus bring Stitch Head to almost-life in secret or does Professor              Erasmus Senior know about it?
– How does Erasmus awaken Stitch Head? What potions and equipment does he   use?

 

We loved delving into these diaries and Guy did too…

Thanks again for sending me your fantastic writing. I was really impressed with the way you brought the scenes to life (as young Erasmus brought Stitch Head to almost-life) and the imagination that went into work.

Holly, Milo, Scarlett and Poppy, I enjoyed how your diary entries gave a sense of the passing of time, especially when Erasmus realised how long it would take to make his creation. I also loved the idea of the dawn light “creeping along the corridor” as if it wasn’t to be trusted…
Felix, “forever glue” is my new favourite bonding agent! I love your writing, especially Stitch Head’s batty behaviour when he’s first awakened. Stitch Head yanking on Erasmus’s hair “like he was taking a strawberry plant out of the ground” is a wonderfully absurd simile. And it was great to see Erasmus getting the better of Stitch Head in the “gobbling a plate of worms first” (!) game by tricking him – it’s a clever way to make you wonder why Erasmus made his creation in the first place.
Sonny and Sam, what a tragic tale! The passing of time here is a nice way to make Erasmus’s separation from Stitch Head all the more heartbreaking – especially as he’s made to feel ashamed for creating him in the first place. It’s a far cry from the touching line, “He looks a bit ugly I suppose … but I love him all the same”. Nice one.
Ben, Hana and Lucas, My favourite part of your writing was how you evoked the moment of awakening after a tense set-up. “As I pumped air being into its mouth, its stomach started rising up and down” paints a great picture. And the idea of Stitch Head wriggling into life is a line I wish I’d thought of myself!
Emily and Mercy, I really enjoyed how you explored the mixed emotions Erasmus felt about telling his dad about his creation. He’s desperate for his father to be proud of him, but still he skulks around and hopes not to wake him … and even after he brings his creation to almost-life he still dares not tell him. This is fascinating and makes the reader wonder why Erasmus is so conflicted. A lovely example of “Show, don’t tell”, which is good advice for any writer. Well done.
Emily Lucy and Marlie, This is a fantastic line: “Finally, I found essence of nightshade, lava and air freshener.” Because any new creation needs to smell fresh! Wonderful. I also loved the idea that Stitch Head was sewn together with fabric from his dad’s pants!
Arthur, Joe, Logan and Rory, your piece was short and to the point, and I think it had my favourite line of all: “I sneakily took some eyeballs from the eyeball cupboard” This single line says so much about the world of the castle. Great work!
We’ve had a sneak preview into the next challenge and we CAN’T WAIT to see the creations – all we’ll say is that it….. NO WE COULDN’T POSSIBLY, you’ll just have to check back next week!!!
Team AAA x

BIG STORY START MOMENT!

Welcome back after the break! Was the Easter bunny kind? Did we all eat a teeny tiny bit too much chocolate?! We hope you’re looking forward to the summer term -we’re all very excited to hear what our adoptees have been up to! So let’s head over to Carden to find out….

A few weeks ago adopted author Rob Llyod Jones asked Year 6 to think about their characters normal life and then to think of a THING that could happen that would thrust their character into a story!

It’s safe to say Year 6 fully embraced this task! We’ve picked a few of our favourites to share with you and Rob had some great feedback too.

Hello all,

Again I really enjoyed reading about all the events that start your exciting stories. I really liked how many of you described your character’s ‘normal life’ before the event that throws him or her OUT of their normal lives and INTO the adventure. Many of you begin by saying your character is living that ‘normal life’ and then use words like these: ‘But then…’, ‘But one day…’ ‘or Then suddenly…’ That’s perfect! Most stories go exactly like this:

Once upon a time there was a (CHARACTER)
Every day he/she (NORMAL LIFE)
Until one day (BIG STORY START MOMENT)
Because of that (THE REST OF THE STORY!)

FEEDBACK:

Aurittri
Great Aurittri! I can’t think of many better story starts than a bullied schoolgirl discovering a secret dragon! What happens next, I wonder?

Hailey
I enjoyed reading about Loliea, Hailey – and liked that you used the words ‘Just then’ in your paragraph. That’s what all stories are about : things happening.

Tayla
Puggi is a fun character Taylor! I think you’ve got a GREAT story starting moment here, as Puggi meets a puggicorn and swaps identities! Perfect!

Connor
PERFECT Connor! Stevie Wellard is a fun character, and you’ve given him a really clear and interesting ‘story start moment’ when he finds a portal in the loo!

Max
I like that you begin by describing ‘Thats what he did everyday’, Max. That’s how stories begin, then they tell us what happened to change all of that – and you have your character being hit by a car! That’s great, now the story has REALLY got going!

Humayra:
Kate is a fun character, Humayra –with the power to control the weather! Is the big event that gets the story going that she loses this power? That is an interesting twist on a usual superhero story! A superhero becomes normal, rather than someone normal becomes a superhero.

Carden you clever lot! The THINGS that happened to your characters have really captured Rob’s and Team AAA’s imaginations! Coming up Rob has a brilliant task for you guys, so until next time….!

Team AAA x

 

Satellite of love…

Ali got in touch with 5P this week and shared what she’s been up to on her travels in the North of England – inspired by a HUGE radio telescope she set them a fantastic task…..

Dear 5P

I’ve been up north. On my journey I went first to Crewe in Cheshire and then drove across the Peak District to North Yorkshire on Monday afternoon, when the sun was shining and the spring landscape was rather gorgeous. The views of the hills and valleys took my breath away! Then I drove past Jodrell Bank where one of the UK’s biggest radio telescopes is sited and saw this…

My jaw just dropped! The dish is HUGE, weird and kind of beautiful. I really wished I had time to stop and go to the visitor centre. I LOVE this kind of stuff. If any of you have read Destination Earth, you’ll know I have a streak of Sci-Fi geek running through me. I’ve visited the Goonhillie site in Cornwall twice now; they take you around on a bus tour to look at all their giant dishes close up – but most of them aren’t in use any more. This one, at Jodrell Bank, very much IS. In fact some of you may have been watching Stargazing Live on the BBC this week and there’s a good chance that’s where it’s all happening (I haven’t had time to check yet but it usually is).

So, this week, inspired by the huge satellite dish at Jodrell Bank, how about this..?  You’re on a school trip and just as the visitor centre is closing, you’re suddenly alone. Paul was too excited by the alien plushies in the gift shop and hurried away with the rest of 5P, leaving you behind while you tied your shoelaces. You should be going after them but, as the stars begin to glow overhead, you find yourself magnetically drawn to the huge satellite dish. It’s making an odd noise… whaaaaaat?

Over to you!

5P had some great fun with the Joderell Bank adventure – we’ve picked our favourite to share, we particularly love Johnny’s story and felt gutted on discovering the Bonbons were GONE! Ali thought it was brilliant too…

Johnny – you are a young man after my own heart. I too love bonbons. Especially lemon – although I’d be willing to try blueberry. I would also be horrifed to find the bonbons in the gift shop were all gone. Maybe some alien life force needs them to build a sticky, chewy death star…

Peace out Earthlings… until next time 5P…

Team AAA x

Goldstone’s Great Cover Art!

Last week Goldstone’s adopted author Guy Bass received a lovely email from Faiza sharing what she thought of his book Stitch Head and some of their brilliant book covers below!

imgres-1.jpg

Hi Guy,

My name is Faiza. We have read up to chapter 8 in your book and the whole of Year 3,including me, LOVE IT! We have all finished drawing and colouring our covers so we are sending a few of them to you to see what you think about them.

My favourite part of the story so far is when Fulbert Freakfinder came back into the story. I like how you get to the point of the story at the right time.

I also find it really funny how the creature talks and his character. I wonder if Professor Erasmus will remember Stitch Head at a point of the story and be best friends with him again…

We hope you have a nice weekend,

From me, Year 3 and

Claire Winter

Year 3 teacher and Year Group Leader

 

 

So many fantastic Stitch Head book covers! Team AAA think there’s a few budding book designers amongst Year 3! Here are Guy’s thoughts…

Hi Faiza (and all the creations of Year 3),

Hope you’re had a cracking weekend, and this week is turning out to be the best ever.
So, I LOVE your covers. They’re fantastic! Lots of variety in composition and colouring, and it was great to see some of the other characters (as well as a few new ones) thrown in there. I love the fact that Creature, Arabella and Fulbert Freakfinder make a few appearances, and all the new monsters are fabulously foul.
One cover in particular impressed me though. After the first Stitch Head book came out, I talked to the publishers about subsequent covers might look, and one idea I had was an extreme close-up of Stitch Head’s face, blending into shadow. Basically it looked exactly like this in my head:

Inline image 1

So well done to whoever read my mind….! Nice one.
Oh and to add to the excitement, and the Stitch Head illustrator, Pete Williamson popped over today, so I showed him your work – he was very impressed! He especially loved the blood dripping eyeballs and the hanging spiders, so well done to whoever did those.
Well done everyone!

Team AAA x

Cool Characters at Carden!

Carden have been chatting all about character these past couple of weeks and in response to Rob’s last task have come up with some very interesting beings of their own – some we’d even like to meet IRL! Here’s a few examples of their brilliant work below:

Hello all

I loved reading your character descriptions. All of them were brilliantly described.

Bradley, Tayla, Darcey, Tommy, Max, Ella, Junior, Nillab,
All of your characters were so much fun to read, so thank you for telling me about them! It seemed that you had fun writing abut them too, because you told me a lot of great detail. You told me how your characters looked and Some of you added interesting background stories too, which is great. It would be good though to know a bit more about how your characters behave now. Characters should always be ACTING – that’s what teaches us about them, rather than how they look or dress. Have a think about how your characters act – are they kind, caring, or evil? Can you give me examples of them being so?

Aunittri
I love that you describe Violence Violet as ‘Nice and Brutal’ ! That is a very interesting way to describe someone – can you think why she is like that? And how does she show these two sides of herself?

Tarian
The Noose is cock and childish – that’s a nice bit of character description. Can you think of examples of how the character shows this?

Carol
Siera Everett is a cool character name! I love that you told me about how she took in the orphan boy – is shows the kind side of her character by the way she acts – which is perfect writing.

Humayra
I like the background details about Katie – and that you say she is Nosy and naughty! Can you think of ways she shows this about herself?

Aldric
I loved this Aldric! DJ sounds really interesting. You’ve created world and characters full of possible stories, with loads of good detail.

Ollie Wow – Dagon sounds really interesting! Why is he so evil though? You tell me how he became the god of the undead, but I’d like to know more about his feelings.

Phoebe
This is a great character description, Phoebe. You tell me a lot about who Sophie is, rather than what he looks like – which is perfect. She sounds like someone who would be a lot of fun to write a story about.

Hailey
This is such a lovely, simply idea for a character, Hailey – with loads of good background. I’d like to know a bit more abut who Loliea is NOW though. Think about her daily routines and hopes and fears…

Michael
Jonny Gibson sounds like a really interesting character, Michael. I like that he ‘hates children’ – but can you tell me why? You describe him well, telling me about who he is rather than what he looks like, which is great.

Lilia
Ziggie sounds like a very interesting character Lilia, and you describe her really
well. You say she is mischievous – but can you give me any examples of when and how?

Connor W
Its great that you chose to write a made u story about a real person, Connow – and a really interesting one too. There’s good background detail here = but can you tell me more about how Paul Pogba thinks and feels?

 

Rob thought that these characters were so great that they should take them further….

Now that you have thought up such great characters, lets do something with them. Most stories begin with a character living their normal life (some people call this the ‘status quo’). That normal life doesn’t have to be a USUAL life to you and me – but just one that for them in their world is normal. So Wild Boy’s normal life at the start is to live on a freak show and fight with Augustus Finch and spy on people using his detective skills. Then SOMETHING HAPPENS to thrusts the character from their normal life and into an adventure. In Wild Boy that SOMETHING is when he defends Sir Oswald and so he has to run away. So then he has to steal money to survive, which ends up with him stealing the mysterious letter – and after that the story takes off. I would like you to think of your character’s normal life that you have all described, and then think what THING could happen to them that would thrust them into a story, and maybe a little more in a paragraph about what that story might be.

Good luck!

Rob

 

We can’t wait to see what Ziggie, DJ, Siera Everett, Violence Violet et al have been up to! Nice work Carden!

Team AAA x

Top writing tips & Tropical fruits with Mile Oak!

In week 3 of Adopt an Author we’re treated to a little insight into what 6L thought of Ross’ deleted scene! Ross revealed something pretty exciting too….

“…you are not ‘one of the few children to have read this draft’. You are the ONLY children to have read this draft! In fact – apart from me and my editor – you’re the only people on Earth to have read it. How weird is that?”

 

29232077-2.jpg

Here are few of examples of what they felt about the unpublished scene…

“I like the version we are reading because it’s not as depressing and it shows how she really feels. It’s sweet how Frank comforts her. The first draft – this is too depressing. No offense but I don’t like this version because it’s not as exciting and is too sad to start off a story. It wasn’t my taste and on your new version it is sad but happy as well because Frank comforts her, but in this draft all it’s trying to prove is she has no friends and no one cares about her.” (Freya S)

“In the final version I like the descriptions you’ve used – smacked, stamped, slapped, lip biting, smirking. I think maybe you should have included the draft as it is not as sad as I thought. In a way it was funny that she stacked tons of food on her plate.” (Oscar)

“It’s a bit too long. I think I prefer the actual one that’s been published because we feel more sympathy for Caitlin because she’s sobbing and Frank doesn’t know what to do. The first draft was really sad.” (Bradley)

“I liked what you did in both but personally I liked the one with Frank because Frank had no idea what to do and you have to imagine what’s happened at school.” (Lauren)

“I liked the first few sentences of the first draft but I’m glad you left the rest out. I think it was too sad and Frank being awkward was funny. I like the descriptions in the final version and how she threw the pineapple. Also when you said ‘clouds of jellyfish lapping against the side of the boat like bubble bath.” (Amelia)

6L came across a picture they were certain Ross would appreciate! Unsure of the pineapple reference?! You’ll just have to pick up Perijee and Me!

 

be-a-pineapple-stand-tall-wear-a-crown-and-be-17812901 2.png

Dear 6L,
I’m delighted to hear that you enjoyed reading my deleted scene!
Thank you so much for your feedback on it. It’s reassuring to see that while some of you liked the scene, most people found it unnecessary and a bit sad, which is exactly why my editor told me to get rid of it! There’s an important lesson there: when you write, you need to SHOW something and not TELL it. That means rather than say “Jim was sad”, you show the reader that Jim is sad by things he says, how he acts etc. So for me, when I wanted to make it clear that Caitlin is lonely and isolated, I didn’t need to TELL the reader by giving them a whole scene that shows what she’s like around other children – instead, I can SHOW them all that in one little scene with Frank. I let the reader see what Caitlin’s like just by the way she talks and the way she describes things. It’s a tricky skill to get used to, but it makes your writing much better!
Thank you so much for your picture of a pineapple! I think it sums up Caitlin’s approach to life perfectly – who wouldn’t want to be a pineapple?
(Fascinating pineapple fact 1: pineapples don’t grow on trees – they grow as a plant that can only have one pineapple at a time! In fact they look a bit like thistles. Check it out:
Image result for pineapple tree
Fascinating pineapple fact 2: people in the 1600s and 1700s used to get their portraits painted holding pineapples to show how wealthy they were as pineapples cost so much to grow and ship over. Here’s King Charles II with one:
Image result for charles II pineapple

I think currently, pineapple facts might be our favourite kind of facts!

6L posed some more brilliant questions to Ross – he’s got some very interesting and useful answers below:

10) Where do you get some imaginative ideas for your book? (Mothakin)
To be honest, ideas tend to spring at me out of nowhere – I’ve asked other authors the same thing and they all agree! It’s very rare that I get the most important ideas first, e.g. the plot, the characters – it’ll be one little moment in the book that grabs my interest. I’ll think, “That’s odd – I wonder what happens in the book to make that scene happen?” and I’ll end up building a book around it.
A good tip: I’ve spent the last few years carrying a little notebook around with me wherever I go. The second I get an idea – usually it’s on a train or a bus – I scribble it down so I don’t forget it. SPACE TORTOISE started this way – so did my next novel, MAX & THE MILLIONS, which is out next March, and so did my next book – a book of short horror stories set at Christmas called CHRISTMAS DINNER OF SOULS!

11) Have you experienced a storm like in the books? (Caitlin)

I am absolutely, utterly petrified of the sea, so thankfully I’ve never been on the ocean when a storm has hit! In fact I’ve only been on a boat a few times – it’s OK if it’s a big boat like a ferry as you tend to not feel the waves as much, but when you’re on a small boat even small waves are utterly terrifying! 

12) What inspired you to write a sci-fi type book? (Kayleigh and Charlie J)

I’m not sure – I always say that I’m not a big fan of sci-fi, but one of my friends (who is a BIG sci-fi fan) says that I am and I just don’t realise it!
I got the idea for PERIJEE & ME when I was walking through a park near where I teach, feeling worried because my publisher wanted me to come up with some new ideas. I saw a man lying on the ground: he was a typical London businessman, just like all the others in the park – pinstripe suit, black shoes, briefcase – but he was lying straight as a plank and flat on his face! It looked like he’d been dropped from a great height and was trying to copy everything around him in this very strange way – which got me onto thinking about him as an alien who wanted to be like a human, but didn’t know how to do it. I immediately started thinking about a girl discovering a shape-shifting alien and began making my idea – after I’d checked the businessman was OK, of course! 
I think when I came up with the idea, I didn’t want to do a sci-fi book – I just found the idea interesting. Of course, when you finish reading PERIJEE & ME, you may find there are a few unexpected surprises…
13) What is your favourite book genre? (Evelyn)

I tend to read lots of different genres – for me, it’s not so much the style of the book as the person writing it! As long as the writer catches my attention, then I don’t care if it’s a book about the history of trumpets or a novel about love. For example, I’ve never really liked Fantasy books, but I’ve always LOVED Terry Pratchett – you may know him as the writer of TRUCKERS, DIGGERS and WINGS, but he also wrote over 40 books about a place called the Discworld which were my favourite books when I was younger. They’re hilarious and beautiful and unbelievably clever!

14) What is your favourite book ever? (Alfie)

Oooooh, this is such a hard question! I don’t know if I could choose a single one – there are a handful of books that I absolutely love and recommend to everyone. For you guys, I would definitely recommend a book called HOLES by Louis Sachar. I don’t know another children’s book like it – if I could write anything as good as this I’d be a very happy man! Read the blurb and see what you think: http://www.louissachar.com/holes.html

15) Do you know anyone with Dyslexia? William

Lots! When I was at secondary school about fifteen years ago, people were beginning to realise that dyslexia was a lot more common that everyone had thought – lots of my friends were being diagnosed and up until then they’d had no idea why they had always struggled to read and write at the same speed as everyone else. There was a big change in how people talked about it – my friends finally realised they weren’t “stupid” or “slow”, they just needed a few tricks and tools to help them get their work done.
As a teacher, I work with a lot of children who have dyslexia too – one of the nicest things I’ve seen change since I was a child is that it’s no longer seen as a child having a “problem”, which is what it used to be like. Now the children I teach are aware that they need a little more help and take charge of it themselves – asking if they can sit closer to the board, sounding out words and using spellcheck on the computer to help them out etc. The only problem is when children like Caitlin are undiagnosed and have no help in place to let them do the best they can, which seems hugely unfair. There are many famous and highly successful people who are dyslexic, including Albert Einstein – here’s a small list of just a few! http://www.dyslexiaonline.com/basics/famous_dyslexics.html
 
Ross
Until next time Mile Oak, when we’ll see 6L’s super storyboards that they’ve all been working so hard on!
Team AAA x